Wellness

re·cov·er·y
/rəˈkəv(ə)rē/
noun

gaining and retaining hope, understanding of one's abilities and disabilities, engagement in active life, personal autonomy, social identity, meaning and purpose in life, and a positive sense of self.


 

Recovery 

What is Recovery?

 

Mental health recovery is a journey of healing and transformation enabling a person with a mental health problem to live a meaningful life in a community of his or her choice while striving to achieve his or her full potential.

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Resources

SAMSHA (the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration/Center for Mental Health Services 

DBSA Steps to Recovery

DBSA Wellness Tracker

Facing Us

WRAP Planning

resources2

 

                                        The 10 fundamental components of mental health recovery 

The Consensus Statement defines mental health recovery as “a journey of healing and transformation enabling a person with a mental health problem to live a meaningful life in a community of his or her choice while striving to achieve his or her potential.”


  • Self-Direction. Consumers determine their own path of recovery with their autonomy, independence, and control of resources.
  • Individualized and Person-Centered. There are multiple pathways to recovery based on an individual’s unique strengths as well as his or her needs, preferences, experiences, and cultural background.
  • Empowerment. Consumers have the authority to participate in all decisions that will affect their lives, and they are educated and supported in this process.
  • Holistic. Recovery encompasses an individual’s whole life, including mind, body, spirit, and community. Recovery embraces all aspects of life, including housing, social networks, employment, education, mental health, and health care treatment, and family supports.
  • Non-Linear. Recovery is not a step-by-step process but one based on continual growth, occasional setbacks, and learning from experience.
  • Strengths-Based. Recovery focuses on valuing and building on the multiple capacities, resiliencies, talents, coping abilities, and inherent worth of individuals. The process of recovery moves forward through interaction with others in supportive, trust-based relationships.
  • Peer Support. Mutual support plays an invaluable role in recovery. Consumers encourage and engage others in recovery and provide each other with a sense of belonging.
  • Respect. Eliminating discrimination and stigma are crucial in achieving recovery. Self-acceptance and regaining belief in oneself are particularly vital.
  • Responsibility. Consumers have a personal responsibility for their own self-care and journeys of recovery. Consumers identify coping strategies and healing processes to promote their own wellness.
  • Hope. Hope is the catalyst of the recovery process and provides the essential and motivating message of a positive future. Peers, families, friends, providers, and others can help foster hope.

 

well·ness
/ˈwelnəs/
noun

Wellness is an active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life. Wellness is more than being free from illness, it is a dynamic process of change and growth.


 

wellness

Wellness

What is Wellness?

 

Wellness is an active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life. Wellness is more than being free from illness, it is a dynamic process of change and growth.

"...a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."

https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/wellness/what-is-wellness

Eight Dimensions of Wellness

There are eight dimensions of wellness: occupational, emotional, spiritual, environmental, financial, physical, social, and intellectual. Each dimension of wellness is interrelated with another. Each dimension is equally vital in the pursuit of optimum health. One can reach an optimal level of wellness by understanding how to maintain and optimize each of the dimensions of wellness.    https://shcs.ucdavis.edu/wellness/what-is-wellness

  1. Emotional—Coping effectively with life and creating satisfying relationships
  2. Environmental—Good health by occupying pleasant, stimulating environments that support well-being
  3. Financial—Satisfaction with current and future financial situations
  4. Intellectual—Recognizing creative abilities and finding ways to expand knowledge and skills
  5. Occupational—Personal satisfaction and enrichment from one’s work
  6. Physical—Recognizing the need for physical activity, healthy foods, and sleep
  7. Social—Developing a sense of connection, belonging, and a well-developed support system
  8. Spiritual—Expanding a sense of purpose and meaning in life